The Forgotten Statistic. Are You Paying Attention?

Right up front I am going to admit this to you: I am not a nerd.  I am a people person not a numbers person. At least that’s what I’ve been telling myself to excuse me from having to get out there and dig a little deeper.

We all have I AM stories we use to make ourselves right and I finally had to admit, it I was going to make a big shift in my business this year I needed to change my I AM statement in regards to numbers.

 

My new I Am story is: I AM good with numbers and I understand how to apply them to my business. (There is a really good book out their that delves into our I AM stories if your interested: I AM: The Power of Discovering Who You Really Are by Howard Falco.

 

So how do you learn to understand more about the numbers?

 

 

You ask questions.

Which is exactly what I did. I went to the source to get answers to my questions about the unique hits stats.I asked the owners of Traffic Exchanges through their Facebook Group.

Here’s the exact question I asked them:

If I were to rank Traffic Exchanges by amount of unique traffic sent, what would you consider a good unique traffic % for a traffic exchange?

I understand this might not be the best way to rank a traffic exchange but I am curious what a Traffic Exchange Owner would consider a good unique traffic %.

To be clear I’m not asking what would be an adequate % or what is the industry standard or average…what would you consider a good level of unique traffic?

For my goal, I wanted to find out if there was an optimum percentage range for unique hits that I should look for in making decisions about the best use of my time (surfing for credits) or money (buying credits ) to maximize my results.

Turns out there really isn’t a consensus on optimal unique hits percentage. But that didn’t mean I didn’t learn. I did.

First I want to give you the percentage range suggested by the participating TE Owners.

 

As you can see some owners gave a range, and Marcus talked about what he suspected the range to be. Matthew present a lot of information but never specified what he would consider a good percentage of unique hits.

Paul Kinder gave the biggest range:

“I’ve found 85% to be as near perfection as possible (for high response rates) then over 60% would still keep me advertising, and over 40% I’d continue using but less often. There are always exceptions to every rule though, all that really counts at the end of the day are response rates.”

 

 

The general consensus was that conversions are a much more important stat.

Matthew Graves put it this way:

“The ultimate Stat to track is conversions, but my experience is that low uniques usually goes hand in hand with low conversions.”

Notice however,  the last part of his sentence: “Low uniques usually goes hand in hand with low conversions

So maybe we have a kind of warning flag which prompts us to look closer at not just uniques, but other stats for the TE producing the low uniques.

Tim Hanson offered his take on low conversions:

“I run for the hills when I see percentages below 40 because to me it means a few things, not many people seeing my ad, penny clickers beating away on a mouse to reach some fictional goal to grab some copper , Doing this whole list building experiment has really opened my eyes to some of the traffic sources i was using that are really really bad . I gotta agree with Shane on his points”

Tim obviously has a high standard for his advertising. He’s in the midst of running his own experiment and publishing his results. See  the link I  share in the resource section of this post to Tim’s experiment.

Shane Bost uses a lower measure for unique hits.

“I just recently started paying more attention to unique % and have found it useful. As an advertiser… When I see 1000+ hits and a single digit unique % I run away.”

For me personally that is a more realistic static to raise a flag.

If you see 10% or lower that should raise a warning flag and get you to dig a little deeper into what is happening at that TE.

TE’s manage their credits in different ways causing the stat to skew one way or another so you need to evaluate using more than one stat.

Matthew even suggested an even better stat that conversions.

“Cost per signup is an even better stat than conversion rate.”

All this reminds of the joke about accountants.

A businessman is  interviewing an accountant.

When he asked him what two plus two was, the accountant got up from his chair, went over to the door, closed it, came back and sat down. Leaning across the desk, he said in a low voice,

“How much do you want it to be?”

He got the job.

How can you use this information to help you determine how to spend your advertising dollars more effectively?

  1. Take time to go and look at your stats. You could be wasting valuable time and effort for little return.
  2. Recognize that a 10% or lower unique hit rate needs to be investigated.
  3. When time, or money is tight, a good strategy would be to evaluate your marketing resources by ranking them by Unique hits and conversions. If Matthew Graves is right, they are probably connected. So spend your time and credits at TE’s with higher unique hits first.

 

Are you paying attention to stats and using them to change how you spend your precious advertising dollars either from your time (surfing for credits) or money (buying credits)?

Resources Used in This Article:

 

Trck.me is my number one recommended tracking program. It’s dead simple to use, very reasonably priced and you get a free trail thrown in.

Get Your Free Trck.me  Trial Here 

The conversation I took these quotes from was a discussion  on A Facebook Group: Traffic Exchanges

You can see the full discussion on Facebook 

To find out more about Tim Hanson’s Experiment:

Tim’s List Building Experiment

The Sponsor of this post is:

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

Leave a comment
  • Thanks for reminding me that analytics is so important. I am hopeless at using tracking urls, but now I will start by investing in trck.me. The only stats I use are the hits I receive each day given to me by a StatCounter on WordPress, which is insufficient information to act upon.

  • Hi Ian, glad you are taking action and getting Trck.me . You’ll find it has a lot of great features. Let me know if you have any questions. Until recently I didn’t pay a whole lot of attention to the details, but that’s all changing.

    Nick

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

Copyright © 2013-14. Created by Meks. Content by Nick Grimshawe.  Powered by WordPress.

SEO Powered by Platinum SEO from Techblissonline
Get Adobe Flash player